Video instructions and help with filling out and completing cbp border crossings

Instructions and Help about cbp border crossings

Point your card cool yeah jeez amen declare if you're bringing fruits meat Birds hurry aids plants and the soil hello are we doing Oh yet in that process no okay oh I don't know where to do that okay other than what we brought from United States for bringing a case of coke and a case of water our luggage clothes and we brought some fruit from the US matter once it crosses okay it's over okay we have like a banana okay a couple of peaches and plums and okay okay yeah they're back here just brought from Africa yeah well plums okay we also have nuts okay we also have nuts do we have to get rid of that no oh okay just the fruit just a fruit that's it no medicines nothing okay and you're getting process yes all right boy that food okay

FAQ

What is your craziest US immigration experience?
As many of you know, the process of acquiring a student visa (F-1 visa) to the United States is nerve-racking for Indian families. Having gone through four years of college, graduating with a good GPA along with multiple summer research stints/internships, then applying to several US universities at considerable expense, and finally being rewarded with an acceptance letter from a respected school, Indian students are sometimes rejected from entering the US at the final hurdle—the visa interview at the US embassy.I recall the buildup to my interview four years ago. Many of my friends had theirs scheduled before mine, and they scared the bejeezus out of me recounting their horror show interviews involving scores of questions from grim interviewers with piercing glares boring into their souls trying to catch out any hesitation in their answers, any possible untruths.My parents did what any self-respecting Indian family does before their kid heads to an interview—they took me to a temple. And not just any temple—they took me about 1000 kilometers north of home to the searingly hot city of Baroda, Gujarat, to visit one particular Hanumanji temple (apparently this was our family God in our family temple, goodness knows why, we’re Tamils from Chennai—and I’m an atheist!)So after much prayer and puja, blessings from family members and well-wishes from friends, I stood outside the US embassy on a cloudy, muggy, summer day, shitting my pants under the narrow canopy that automatically opened over the street when it rained (a nice touch there, ‘Murica).My stomach churned as the line slowly moved forward. My heart leaped into my mouth as I passed through the gates, only to be confronted by armed security guards who proceeded to take away anything I had in my pockets—pens, coins, paper, etc.Please don’t take my clothes too, please don’t take my clothes too, I prayed silently.The guard gestured at my jeans. Resigned to my fate, I started to unzip them.“What are you doing?” he asked, amazed. “Just take off your belt and pass through the scanner.”….Finally through the gates, I was taken aback at how simple the next room looked. Then I understood why—it was just a queue room. A room for this damn queue.Half an hour later we passed into the Interview Room. People lined up in front of about a dozen booths, each with a White Man or White Lady inside (must be the Americans, I thought fearfully, please let them understand my accent).The room was air-conditioned. I was sweating.It was large and airy. I gasped for breath.Now I was in front of one of the White Men. He beckoned me forward.He smiled at me evil— no, pleasantly — it was a pleasant smile!“Hi there, how’s your day going?”He greeted me — what do I do? Is this part of the interview? Oh no, I don’t have an answer. Smile. Smiling is good. He won’t hate you if you smile.I smiled. He waited.Oh shit, he asked you a question. Answer it, jackass!“OH IT IS—you’re too loud, dolt—going well”, I whispered.He didn’t hear that last bit, but he nodded as if he did.“May I have your I-20?”“Here it is,” I breathed.He stared down at it for a minute. Then—“So, you’re going to Purdue?”Say yes, don’t say yup. And don’t shout.“YUP!” I shouted.“Ok then, you’re good to go” he said, stamping my passport.“What?” I yelped, staring at him in disbelief.“You’re good to go, sir, your application has been accepted.”You mean after all that stress you didn’t ask me a single question? Not one? Why?? Are you crazy, man? I even lied about my day, it was shitty as hell, you should quiz me on it! Make me grovel for that visa, like the bastards I know you interviewers are!“Good luck with your PhD, Mr.Raman, and enjoy your stay in the United States of America.”“Thank you,” I replied, my throat catching.I was going to America courtesy this senile interviewer. Thank you Hanumanji!
Can a CBP officer detect that I have a pending H1B extension in the process if I am in/out of the border using my tourist visa?
It is your responsibility to uphold the conditions of your visa. If your visa does not allow you to exit the USA whilst another application is being processed then don’t exit the USA! Simple!And yes you are likely to get ‘caught’. No doubt then you will think it is unfair!
How would CBP/ICE react if I declare myself stateless at an internal border control checkpoint?
How would CBP/ICE react if I declare myself stateless at an internal border control checkpoint?Not sure what you are asking here but if you arrive at a US border seeking entry to the USA and declare that you are an idiot I’m sure the agent will just smile, turn you around and refuse you entry to the USA.Customs and immigration officers really don’t have time for people who try and make stupid political protests on their shift. They have thousands of people to screen in very little time. So if you give them a good reason to refuse you entry and move on to the next legitimate traveler they will gladly take it.
Why is CBP referred to as "officer" and Border Patrol as "agent"?
Both are law enforcers.Some police forces like the FBI call their enforcers, agents. Some call them officers.The Border Patrol predates the CBP.CBP was formed out of the merger of the customs officers and part of the INS agents. Officer is what DHS decided to call its law enforcers.